Buku An Anglo-Saxon Cemetry at Collingbourne Ducis, Wiltshire by Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy Nick Stoodley
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Buku An Anglo-Saxon Cemetry at Collingbourne Ducis, Wiltshire by Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy Nick Stoodley

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An Anglo-Saxon Cemetry at Collingbourne Ducis, Wiltshire by Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy Nick Stoodley

Author:Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy, Nick Stoodley

Language: eng

Format: epub

Tags: HISTORY / Medieval

ISBN: 9781911137016

Publisher: Wessex

Published: 2016-07-30T16:00:00+00:00

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An Anglo-Saxon Cemetry at Collingbourne Ducis, Wiltshire by Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy Nick Stoodley

Concluding Remarks

Irrespective of the most representative MNI, whether four or nine, cremation was clearly the minority rite within the cemetery, there currently being 116 excavated inhumation graves (inclusive of the previously excavated features; see above). The cemetery is likely to continue downslope to the south and, the cremation-related deposits being concentrated in the southern portion of the site, further deposits associated with this mortuary rite may still remain unexcavated in this area (redeposited cremated bone was recovered from the southern-most inhumation graves). In keeping with the majority of early Saxon cemeteries from southern England, however, the proportion of cremation graves is likely to remain relatively low. Inclusion of individuals across the age range and members of both sexes indicates that neither age nor sex was a factor in the choice of mortuary rite. It appears that some cremations were undertaken at least in the early part of the 6th century (eg, grave 1297) but the potential curation of remains renders evidence associated with the later 6th century inhumation grave (where cremated bone was deposited in a cut through the grave fill) open to debate. Consequently it cannot be stated with confidence that cremation was preferentially undertaken at any one stage of the cemetery’s use. The apparent clustering of a group of cremation graves in the south-western area of the cemetery may suggest the use of the rite by a specific family group. This leaves open to question the nature of the deposits in the eastern half of the cemetery which appear to represent either placed ‘token’/memento mori deposits of possibly curated material, or redeposited material of some form. If the latter interpretation is correct and the material includes, as it appears to, redeposited pyre debris, the possibility also exists that corpses were being cremated in the vicinity of the cemetery but that the majority of the bone was being removed for burial elsewhere, perhaps entirely outside the region.

The curation and/or transportation of cremated bone is known to have been practiced in the Roman period, particularly for military personnel serving away from home (Table X, Law IX of the Roman Laws of the Twelve Tables; McKinley 2004a). Oestigaard (1999) has argued that such activity formed a common part of the mortuary rite across a wide temporal range in parts of Scandinavia. The duality (some may argue multiplicity) of the cremation rite certainly lends itself to a potentially wide range of individual practices. At Collingbourne Ducis, with its unusual variety of deposit types, not all of which have the characteristics of formal burials, it may be that we have the remains both of material transferred to the site from elsewhere – in the form of curated token/memento mori deposits intended for eventual deposition with a loved-one – and debris derived from cremations undertaken within/adjacent to the cemetery from which the bone collected for burial was transported back to the individual’s place of origin rather than their being buried where they died. The site lies close to the 6th century western margins of

 

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An Anglo-Saxon Cemetry at Collingbourne Ducis, Wiltshire by Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy Nick Stoodley

Author:Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy, Nick Stoodley , Date: June 6, 2019

,Views: 25

Author:Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy, Nick Stoodley

Language: eng

Format: epub

Tags: HISTORY / Medieval

ISBN: 9781911137016

Publisher: Wessex

Published: 2016-07-30T16:00:00+00:00
Concluding Remarks

Irrespective of the most representative MNI, whether four or nine, cremation was clearly the minority rite within the cemetery, there currently being 116 excavated inhumation graves (inclusive of the previously excavated features; see above). The cemetery is likely to continue downslope to the south and, the cremation-related deposits being concentrated in the southern portion of the site, further deposits associated with this mortuary rite may still remain unexcavated in this area (redeposited cremated bone was recovered from the southern-most inhumation graves). In keeping with the majority of early Saxon cemeteries from southern England, however, the proportion of cremation graves is likely to remain relatively low. Inclusion of individuals across the age range and members of both sexes indicates that neither age nor sex was a factor in the choice of mortuary rite. It appears that some cremations were undertaken at least in the early part of the 6th century (eg, grave 1297) but the potential curation of remains renders evidence associated with the later 6th century inhumation grave (where cremated bone was deposited in a cut through the grave fill) open to debate. Consequently it cannot be stated with confidence that cremation was preferentially undertaken at any one stage of the cemetery’s use. The apparent clustering of a group of cremation graves in the south-western area of the cemetery may suggest the use of the rite by a specific family group. This leaves open to question the nature of the deposits in the eastern half of the cemetery which appear to represent either placed ‘token’/memento mori deposits of possibly curated material, or redeposited material of some form. If the latter interpretation is correct and the material includes, as it appears to, redeposited pyre debris, the possibility also exists that corpses were being cremated in the vicinity of the cemetery but that the majority of the bone was being removed for burial elsewhere, perhaps entirely outside the region.

The curation and/or transportation of cremated bone is known to have been practiced in the Roman period, particularly for military personnel serving away from home (Table X, Law IX of the Roman Laws of the Twelve Tables; McKinley 2004a). Oestigaard (1999) has argued that such activity formed a common part of the mortuary rite across a wide temporal range in parts of Scandinavia. The duality (some may argue multiplicity) of the cremation rite certainly lends itself to a potentially wide range of individual practices. At Collingbourne Ducis, with its unusual variety of deposit types, not all of which have the characteristics of formal burials, it may be that we have the remains both of material transferred to the site from elsewhere – in the form of curated token/memento mori deposits intended for eventual deposition with a loved-one – and debris derived from cremations undertaken within/adjacent to the cemetery from which the bone collected for burial was transported back to the individual’s place of origin rather than their being buried where they died. The site lies close to the 6th century western margins of

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