Buku Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford
Rp149,000.00 Tambah ke keranjang

Buku Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford

Rp149,000.00

Free worldwide shipping on all orders over $50

  • 30 days easy returns
  • Order yours before 2.30pm for same day dispatch
Guaranteed Safe Checkout

Deskripsi

Jual Buku
Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford

Author:Ward Rutherford

Language: eng

Format: epub

ISBN: 9781609259914

Publisher: Red Wheel Weiser

WE ONLY SELL HIGH QUALITY REPRINTED BOOKS, at AFFORDABLE PRICE

Ingin dalam bentuk ebook? Order disini>>

Kwalitas Reprint Book Bukan Buku Original (Kwalitas hampir setara)

Diprint dengan mesin terbaik, Mengunakan Lem Panas Press laminasi sehingga cover lebih lengket
#Ukuran B5 (Standart Buku Original)
#Kertas Bookpaper/HVS Lebih baik untuk mata, tidak menyebabkan mata cepat lelah,
#Mengunakan Kwalitas kertas terbaik
#Kwalitas tinta tajam dan bagus (mirip Original)
#Cover dengan Softcover, jika anda membutuhkan hardcover silahkan request
#Packing sudah include Bubble Wrap dan EXTRA SAFETY untuk Hard Cover, 100% AMAN

Ingin Buku Original yang tersedia cek disini>> 

Melayani Juga
Jual Buku Import Original
Jual ebook Buku
Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford

While the myths have no direct references to human sacrifice, ‘The Intoxication of the Ulstermen’ and two of the Irish ‘Destruction’ tales—‘Dind Rig’ and ‘Da Derga’s Hostel’—have passages hinting at it. All take place at Samain, when sacrifice is known to have been offered, and contain references to the burning down of a building.

The last motif recurs in ‘Branwen daughter of Llyr,’ where the victims are the giant Llassar Laes Gyngwyd and his wife, who had earlier stepped from a lake bearing a huge cauldron. When they become increasingly ill-disposed towards those who have given them sanctuary their destruction is encompassed. They are trapped in an iron house which is made white hot, but they manage to break out and escape. This has prompted some writers to see in it the same cryptic hints as are contained in the three Irish stories. In fact, there may be another explanation. A passing reference to Llassar Laes Gyngwyd in ‘Manawydan’ associates him with saddlery and enamelling. The latter, which was a Celtic invention, requires very high temperatures to liquefy the glass used in it so that the ‘iron-house’ in ‘Branwen’ could well represent an enameller’s kiln.

There is little doubt that Druidic sacrifice included the Triple Death mentioned by Lucan. Usually this involved hanging or strangulation, followed by burning or stabbing and immersion in water. At least one king, Muirchertach mac Erca, is known to have died in this way and Lindow Man, who if not a king was certainly an aristocrat, underwent such a death. Post-mortem examination shows that he was first stunned with two blows from an axe, then garrotted with a ligature so tight that it broke his neck. Finally, his throat was cut. It has been suggested that this was to let the blood flow, but there can, of course, have been no blood flow after death as circulation would have ceased, though the custom of cutting the throats of victims to allow this to happen—presumably as a ritual fertilization of the earth—is known from other contexts.

 

##Sample Book

[ux_instagram_feed username=”#kotabook”]

Jual Buku
Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford

jual Buku
Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford murah, jual ebook murah, jual ebook import, jual buku import, jual buku Buku
Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford

 

Home

>

Literature & Fiction

Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford

Author:Ward Rutherford , Date: June 7, 2019

,Views: 37

Author:Ward Rutherford

Language: eng

Format: epub

ISBN: 9781609259914

Publisher: Red Wheel Weiser
While the myths have no direct references to human sacrifice, ‘The Intoxication of the Ulstermen’ and two of the Irish ‘Destruction’ tales—‘Dind Rig’ and ‘Da Derga’s Hostel’—have passages hinting at it. All take place at Samain, when sacrifice is known to have been offered, and contain references to the burning down of a building.

The last motif recurs in ‘Branwen daughter of Llyr,’ where the victims are the giant Llassar Laes Gyngwyd and his wife, who had earlier stepped from a lake bearing a huge cauldron. When they become increasingly ill-disposed towards those who have given them sanctuary their destruction is encompassed. They are trapped in an iron house which is made white hot, but they manage to break out and escape. This has prompted some writers to see in it the same cryptic hints as are contained in the three Irish stories. In fact, there may be another explanation. A passing reference to Llassar Laes Gyngwyd in ‘Manawydan’ associates him with saddlery and enamelling. The latter, which was a Celtic invention, requires very high temperatures to liquefy the glass used in it so that the ‘iron-house’ in ‘Branwen’ could well represent an enameller’s kiln.

There is little doubt that Druidic sacrifice included the Triple Death mentioned by Lucan. Usually this involved hanging or strangulation, followed by burning or stabbing and immersion in water. At least one king, Muirchertach mac Erca, is known to have died in this way and Lindow Man, who if not a king was certainly an aristocrat, underwent such a death. Post-mortem examination shows that he was first stunned with two blows from an axe, then garrotted with a ligature so tight that it broke his neck. Finally, his throat was cut. It has been suggested that this was to let the blood flow, but there can, of course, have been no blood flow after death as circulation would have ceased, though the custom of cutting the throats of victims to allow this to happen—presumably as a ritual fertilization of the earth—is known from other contexts.

Tolstoy suggests that the death of Lleu described in ‘Math son of Mathonwy,’ in which he is stabbed with a spear while standing with one foot on a bath of water placed on a river’s bank, may also contain relics of a Triple Death. The same writer discusses a reference to it in a manuscript in the British Library which refers to Merlin’s being pierced with a stake, stoned, and then drowned.

The practice akin to sacrifice of severing and preserving the head, of which both the classical sources and archaeology give testimony, repeatedly occurs in both Irish and British Matters. We are told that King Conchobhar of Ulster had a room full of these trophies and they also figure in ‘Gereint’ and ‘Peredur.’

The practice survives even in versions as late as Malory’s Morte d’Arthur (fifteenth century). In Chapter 25 of Book VIII, Sir Tristram, a prisoner of Sir Breunor at the castle of Pluere, is told of a custom whereby Sir Breunor’s lady

Loading…

Download

Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford.epub

Copyright Disclaimer:

This site does not store any files on its server. We only index and link
to content provided by other sites. Please contact the content providers
to delete copyright contents if any and email us, we’ll remove relevant
links or contents immediately.

Ulasan

Belum ada ulasan.

Jadilah yang pertama memberikan ulasan “Buku Celtic Mythology by Ward Rutherford”

Alamat email Anda tidak akan dipublikasikan. Ruas yang wajib ditandai *