Buku Gaelic Incantations, Charms and Blessings of the Hebrides by MacKenzie William
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Gaelic Incantations, Charms and Blessings of the Hebrides by MacKenzie William

Author:MacKenzie, William [MacKenzie, William]

Language: eng

Format: azw3, epub

Publisher: AlbaCraft Publishing

Published: 2013-01-07T16:00:00+00:00

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Gaelic Incantations, Charms and Blessings of the Hebrides by MacKenzie William

The Caul — Currachd-rath, or, as it is frequently called, Cochull — is a membraneous cap in which the head of a child is sometimes enveloped when born. Such children are believed to be the special favourites of fortune. In addition to the caul being regarded as a protective charm in battle, it is also believed to afford protection from drowning, and is looked upon as an article of considerable marketable value among sailors. The belief in its efficacy is by no means confined to the Highlands or even to Scotland. The French in Mauritius attach special virtue to it, and offer it for sale at fancy prices. In 1835, an advertisement in the following terms appeared in the Times newspaper: “A child’s caul to be disposed of, a well-known preservative against drowning, &c. Price 10 guineas.” Mr Moore refers to this superstition in the Isle of Man, and states that a caul has been advertised for sale in a Liverpool newspaper in 1891. Professor O’Growney informs me that advertisements to the same effect appeared frequently in Irish newspapers till about ten years ago.

In connection with this matter, it may be mentioned that the cowl of the monk — Gaelic, cochull; Latin, cucullus — was also used as an amulet in battle. In the life of St Columba, in the Book of Lismore, we are told that Columcille sained, or consecrated, a cowl for the warrior Aed Slaine, and said that he (the warrior) would not be slain so long as that cowl should be on him. Aed Slaine went upon a raid. He forgot his cowl. He was slain on that day. Again, in Adamnan’s Life of Columba (Book II., ch. 25), mention is made of Findlugan donning the Saint’s cowl to protect him from the spear-thrusts of Manus Dextera! St Columba is said to have written the MS. known as the Cathach. His kindred, the O’Donnells, always brought it with them to battle, and it was their custom to have it carried three times round their army before fighting, in the belief that this would ensure victory. Hence the name Cathach, or Battle-book.

In Ireland an Incantation known as Marthainn Phadraic serves the purpose of the Highland Sian. According to tradition, St Patrick recited the words over the corpse of one Aine, and stated that any one hearing it would escape many dangers. The language of the Marthainn is very old, and several passages have crept into it which are very obscure. The Irish peasantry attribute great virtues to it, and are very anxious to have it. Irish soldiers in foreign lands have been known to send for it in the belief that it would preserve them from being shot. For the following version of it I am indebted to Mr D. O’Faherty, editor of Siamsa an Gheimhridh. He took it down from the recitation of an old man named Michael Joyce:

 

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Gaelic Incantations, Charms and Blessings of the Hebrides by MacKenzie William

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Gaelic Incantations, Charms and Blessings of the Hebrides by MacKenzie William

Author:MacKenzie, William [MacKenzie, William] , Date: June 6, 2019

,Views: 26

Author:MacKenzie, William [MacKenzie, William]

Language: eng

Format: azw3, epub

Publisher: AlbaCraft Publishing

Published: 2013-01-07T16:00:00+00:00
The Caul — Currachd-rath, or, as it is frequently called, Cochull — is a membraneous cap in which the head of a child is sometimes enveloped when born. Such children are believed to be the special favourites of fortune. In addition to the caul being regarded as a protective charm in battle, it is also believed to afford protection from drowning, and is looked upon as an article of considerable marketable value among sailors. The belief in its efficacy is by no means confined to the Highlands or even to Scotland. The French in Mauritius attach special virtue to it, and offer it for sale at fancy prices. In 1835, an advertisement in the following terms appeared in the Times newspaper: “A child’s caul to be disposed of, a well-known preservative against drowning, &c. Price 10 guineas.” Mr Moore refers to this superstition in the Isle of Man, and states that a caul has been advertised for sale in a Liverpool newspaper in 1891. Professor O’Growney informs me that advertisements to the same effect appeared frequently in Irish newspapers till about ten years ago.

In connection with this matter, it may be mentioned that the cowl of the monk — Gaelic, cochull; Latin, cucullus — was also used as an amulet in battle. In the life of St Columba, in the Book of Lismore, we are told that Columcille sained, or consecrated, a cowl for the warrior Aed Slaine, and said that he (the warrior) would not be slain so long as that cowl should be on him. Aed Slaine went upon a raid. He forgot his cowl. He was slain on that day. Again, in Adamnan’s Life of Columba (Book II., ch. 25), mention is made of Findlugan donning the Saint’s cowl to protect him from the spear-thrusts of Manus Dextera! St Columba is said to have written the MS. known as the Cathach. His kindred, the O’Donnells, always brought it with them to battle, and it was their custom to have it carried three times round their army before fighting, in the belief that this would ensure victory. Hence the name Cathach, or Battle-book.

In Ireland an Incantation known as Marthainn Phadraic serves the purpose of the Highland Sian. According to tradition, St Patrick recited the words over the corpse of one Aine, and stated that any one hearing it would escape many dangers. The language of the Marthainn is very old, and several passages have crept into it which are very obscure. The Irish peasantry attribute great virtues to it, and are very anxious to have it. Irish soldiers in foreign lands have been known to send for it in the belief that it would preserve them from being shot. For the following version of it I am indebted to Mr D. O’Faherty, editor of Siamsa an Gheimhridh. He took it down from the recitation of an old man named Michael Joyce:

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