Buku The Cambridge Medieval History – Book XII: The Viking Invasions, the Kingdom of England, and the Western Caliphate by Mawer Allen
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The Cambridge Medieval History – Book XII: The Viking Invasions, the Kingdom of England, and the Western Caliphate by Mawer Allen

Author:Mawer, Allen [Mawer, Allen]

Language: eng

Format: azw

Publisher: Perennial Press

Published: 2016-02-26T16:00:00+00:00

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The Cambridge Medieval History – Book XII: The Viking Invasions, the Kingdom of England, and the Western Caliphate by Mawer Allen

EDGAR’S ADMINISTRATIVE MEASURES

Though the social and religious movements are clearly the most important things that happened in Edgar’s reign, it must not be thought that the king remained all his life a mere tool in the hands of the ecclesiastics and had no policy of his own. Like most of his immediate predecessors, he evidently, on coming to manhood, had closely at heart the due maintenance of order in all parts of his realm, and kept constantly amending and sharpening the machinery for enforcing the peace and dispensing justice. His laws no doubt show the influence of Dunstan in the minuteness with which they deal with tithe and the observance of fasts and festivals, but they are also remarkable for their precise rules as to buying and selling and the pursuit of thieves, as to the maintenance of the suretyship system of frithborhs and as to the periods when the various courts were to be held. Specially famous is his ordinance as to the local courts, which contains the first clear proof of a regular division of the shires for judicial purposes into moderate sized units called ‘hundreds’, each with its own tribunal sitting every four weeks. A further step of somewhat doubtful wisdom, as it tended to undermine the royal authority, was to place some of the hundreds, so far as the administration of justice was concerned, under the control of the reformed monasteries. Considerable districts thereby acquired the status of ecclesiastical franchises, in which the local courts were no longer held in the king’s name, and in which the profits of justice went into the coffers of some minster church and not into the king’s treasury. The first monastic houses to acquire these franchises, or ‘sokes’ as they were termed in the vernacular (from sócne, the Anglo-Saxon term for jurisdiction), were Peterborough and Ely; and there seems no reason to doubt the local traditions, which tell us that they obtained them from Edgar on their first foundation at the instance of BishopAethelwold. No formal Latin charters from the king have come down to us attesting these grants, but in either case there are some curious Anglo-Saxon records still existing which more or less explain their nature. From these we can see that Peterborough obtained judicial control over a block of eight hundreds inNorthamptonshire, having Oundle as their chief town, while Ely obtained similar control not only over the two hundreds lying round the monastery, which made up the Isle of Ely, but also over a district of five hundreds in East Suffolk, known as ‘Wichlawa’, having Woodbridge on the Deben as its centre and also comprisingSudbourne with the port of Orford, an estate which Edgar had granted to Aethelwold as a reward for translating the Rule of St Benedict into English. In the sokes thus created the essential novelty was not merely the transfer of the king’s rights to the monks, but the fact that by the transfer great numbers of men, both small and great, who were

 

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The Cambridge Medieval History – Book XII: The Viking Invasions, the Kingdom of England, and the Western Caliphate by Mawer Allen

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The Cambridge Medieval History – Book XII: The Viking Invasions, the Kingdom of England, and the Western Caliphate by Mawer Allen

Author:Mawer, Allen [Mawer, Allen] , Date: June 6, 2019

,Views: 27

Author:Mawer, Allen [Mawer, Allen]

Language: eng

Format: azw

Publisher: Perennial Press

Published: 2016-02-26T16:00:00+00:00
EDGAR’S ADMINISTRATIVE MEASURES

Though the social and religious movements are clearly the most important things that happened in Edgar’s reign, it must not be thought that the king remained all his life a mere tool in the hands of the ecclesiastics and had no policy of his own. Like most of his immediate predecessors, he evidently, on coming to manhood, had closely at heart the due maintenance of order in all parts of his realm, and kept constantly amending and sharpening the machinery for enforcing the peace and dispensing justice. His laws no doubt show the influence of Dunstan in the minuteness with which they deal with tithe and the observance of fasts and festivals, but they are also remarkable for their precise rules as to buying and selling and the pursuit of thieves, as to the maintenance of the suretyship system of frithborhs and as to the periods when the various courts were to be held. Specially famous is his ordinance as to the local courts, which contains the first clear proof of a regular division of the shires for judicial purposes into moderate sized units called ‘hundreds’, each with its own tribunal sitting every four weeks. A further step of somewhat doubtful wisdom, as it tended to undermine the royal authority, was to place some of the hundreds, so far as the administration of justice was concerned, under the control of the reformed monasteries. Considerable districts thereby acquired the status of ecclesiastical franchises, in which the local courts were no longer held in the king’s name, and in which the profits of justice went into the coffers of some minster church and not into the king’s treasury. The first monastic houses to acquire these franchises, or ‘sokes’ as they were termed in the vernacular (from sócne, the Anglo-Saxon term for jurisdiction), were Peterborough and Ely; and there seems no reason to doubt the local traditions, which tell us that they obtained them from Edgar on their first foundation at the instance of BishopAethelwold. No formal Latin charters from the king have come down to us attesting these grants, but in either case there are some curious Anglo-Saxon records still existing which more or less explain their nature. From these we can see that Peterborough obtained judicial control over a block of eight hundreds inNorthamptonshire, having Oundle as their chief town, while Ely obtained similar control not only over the two hundreds lying round the monastery, which made up the Isle of Ely, but also over a district of five hundreds in East Suffolk, known as ‘Wichlawa’, having Woodbridge on the Deben as its centre and also comprisingSudbourne with the port of Orford, an estate which Edgar had granted to Aethelwold as a reward for translating the Rule of St Benedict into English. In the sokes thus created the essential novelty was not merely the transfer of the king’s rights to the monks, but the fact that by the transfer great numbers of men, both small and great, who were

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