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The Early Islamic Grammatical Tradition by Ramzi Baalbaki

Author:Ramzi Baalbaki

Language: eng

Format: epub

Publisher: Taylor and Francis

Published: 2017-05-14T16:00:00+00:00

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The Early Islamic Grammatical Tradition by Ramzi Baalbaki

To support his charge that knowledge of language by habit and study and the use of independent reasoning are sufficient for understanding both the utterance and its meaning, and that Mattā’s logic is not a universal art of meaning, al-Sīrāfī repeats his question regarding the meanings of the coordinate conjunction wa that Mattā had not been able to answer (116.17, cf. 114.5). He then turns to refute the statement made by Mattā and his friends that Arab grammarians do not know the correct uses of the particle fl (“in”) because these grammarians say that it expresses the “vessel” fai’ā”), while in reality it expresses a number of other and different relations that the logicians claim to have learned from the Greek thinkers who presumably discovered them from the Greek language. These other relations, according to al-Sīrāfī, are not new meanings, but more Hmited aspects of the broader relation expressed by the “vessel”; they are not difficult to uncover by any “reasonable” man belonging to any nation; and one need not go to the Greeks to discover them (117.8–17). al-Sīrāfī explains next the various usages of the coordinate conjunction wa. For the most part, these explanations concern the “form of the utterance” (al-shakl al-lafẓī). Since Mattā could have retorted that he does not know these because they concern the form of the utterance rather than the “intelūgible meaning” (al-ma’nā al-aqlī) al-Sīrāfī proceeds to ask him a question that deals more with the intelligible meaning than with the form of the utterance: Is it correct to say “Zayd [Socrates] is the best of his brothers” as well as “Zayd [Socrates] is the best of the brothers”? Thoughtlessly, Mattā says yes. al-Sīrāfī explains later (120.5–17) for the benefit of the vizier and the audience that one can say the latter only, because only that phrase includes Zayd. As for Mattā, al-Sīrāfī will not instruct him in Arabic grammar. The public debate is not a substitute for the classroom (majlis al-ta’lim), but an occasion to uncover Mat-tā’s habitual sophistry. Mattā’s mistake proves false his earlier claim that the grammarian inquires into the utterance but not the meaning, while the logician inquires into the meaning but not the utterance; al-Sīrāfī has shown that the grammarian inquires into both the utterance and the meaning. Mattā’s logic is not an art of meaning. It does not provide him with a reasoned method through which to judge sound from unsound meaning. For despite his logic, he was led to give an opinion without understanding the ground for it (118.3–119.10).

The examples with which al-Sīrāfī confutes Mattā are not examples of pure intelligible meaning, but of meaning embodied in the utterance or of the intelligibles immanent in a particular language. The true logician—that is, the man who knows the logic of a particular language such as Arabic—must be able to express himself correctly, and distinguish correct from incorrect expressions on all levels and with respect to both the utterance and the meaning, in that language. al-Sīrāfī concedes that the logician may choose to “keep silent” and give free rein to his thought to “wander among meanings.

 

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The Early Islamic Grammatical Tradition by Ramzi Baalbaki

Author:Ramzi Baalbaki , Date: June 23, 2019

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Author:Ramzi Baalbaki

Language: eng

Format: epub

Publisher: Taylor and Francis

Published: 2017-05-14T16:00:00+00:00
To support his charge that knowledge of language by habit and study and the use of independent reasoning are sufficient for understanding both the utterance and its meaning, and that Mattā’s logic is not a universal art of meaning, al-Sīrāfī repeats his question regarding the meanings of the coordinate conjunction wa that Mattā had not been able to answer (116.17, cf. 114.5). He then turns to refute the statement made by Mattā and his friends that Arab grammarians do not know the correct uses of the particle fl (“in”) because these grammarians say that it expresses the “vessel” fai’ā”), while in reality it expresses a number of other and different relations that the logicians claim to have learned from the Greek thinkers who presumably discovered them from the Greek language. These other relations, according to al-Sīrāfī, are not new meanings, but more Hmited aspects of the broader relation expressed by the “vessel”; they are not difficult to uncover by any “reasonable” man belonging to any nation; and one need not go to the Greeks to discover them (117.8–17). al-Sīrāfī explains next the various usages of the coordinate conjunction wa. For the most part, these explanations concern the “form of the utterance” (al-shakl al-lafẓī). Since Mattā could have retorted that he does not know these because they concern the form of the utterance rather than the “intelūgible meaning” (al-ma’nā al-aqlī) al-Sīrāfī proceeds to ask him a question that deals more with the intelligible meaning than with the form of the utterance: Is it correct to say “Zayd [Socrates] is the best of his brothers” as well as “Zayd [Socrates] is the best of the brothers”? Thoughtlessly, Mattā says yes. al-Sīrāfī explains later (120.5–17) for the benefit of the vizier and the audience that one can say the latter only, because only that phrase includes Zayd. As for Mattā, al-Sīrāfī will not instruct him in Arabic grammar. The public debate is not a substitute for the classroom (majlis al-ta’lim), but an occasion to uncover Mat-tā’s habitual sophistry. Mattā’s mistake proves false his earlier claim that the grammarian inquires into the utterance but not the meaning, while the logician inquires into the meaning but not the utterance; al-Sīrāfī has shown that the grammarian inquires into both the utterance and the meaning. Mattā’s logic is not an art of meaning. It does not provide him with a reasoned method through which to judge sound from unsound meaning. For despite his logic, he was led to give an opinion without understanding the ground for it (118.3–119.10).

The examples with which al-Sīrāfī confutes Mattā are not examples of pure intelligible meaning, but of meaning embodied in the utterance or of the intelligibles immanent in a particular language. The true logician—that is, the man who knows the logic of a particular language such as Arabic—must be able to express himself correctly, and distinguish correct from incorrect expressions on all levels and with respect to both the utterance and the meaning, in that language. al-Sīrāfī concedes that the logician may choose to “keep silent” and give free rein to his thought to “wander among meanings.

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