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The Norse Influence on Celtic Scotland by Henderson George

Author:Henderson, George [Henderson, George]

Language: eng

Format: azw3

Publisher: AlbaCraft Publishing

Published: 2013-02-12T16:00:00+00:00

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The Norse Influence on Celtic Scotland by Henderson George

Connspunn na h-aoidhealachd

leòghann na rìoghalachd

in his poem on Sir James Macdonald of Sleat, as also bruidhinn, bridhinn, ‘speaking, talk,’ elsewhere: the change from rīgh to ruigh, raoigh, in the G. for ‘king’ is common. So in Ivist, Uivist, Ui’ist. The name Uist, says Munch, is simply the Norse īvist, habitation, etc. A transitional spelling is shown in Wyest of 1615. Even by dropping the N. initial ī the transition is easy to Gadhelic Ui’st. There is no pre-Celtic or non-Aryan inscrutableness in this word. Skye is named in Norse Skídh; the Dean of Lismore refers to the island as Clar Skeith, ‘the Board of Skith,’ showing that the Norse name of the island was remembered and translated by Clar: Norse Skidh has among other meanings that of ‘tablet.’ Both Adamnan’s form, Scia (circa 700 A.D.) and Tigernach’s form in his Annals for the year 688, which is Scith, agree with the modern pronunciation, which have ĭ short, as in Sgĭtheanach, ‘Skye-man.’ “The earliest charter and record forms of the name Skye are Skey (1292), Sky (1336), and Ski in the Manx Chronicle. Adamnan’s Scia shows no trace of th. The root is Celtic sky, ‘cut, slice,’ and the whole means the ‘indented isle.’ The root ski is still the basis of Gaelic sgīath and Norse skídh.”60 Although the name is pre-Norse, Skye abounds in Norse names. Ūig, N. vík, ‘bay’; Sleat, G. Sléit, from N. sléttr, ‘level’; Minginish, N. mikinn-nes, ‘great or main ness’; Trotternish, G. Trontarnis (n inserted to show the nasal of the present pronunciation), N. Þrondar-nes, ‘Thrond’s nes,’ Thrond being a frequent personal name in Icelandic: cf. Trondhjem, in Norway. Bràcadal, N. brekka-dalr, ‘brink or slope dale,’ the ā being sporadically lengthened in Gadhelic here, if we do not postulate some dialectal variance in the Norse of the Viking period, as E. brink, together with Danish and Swedish, preserve an older form than N. brekka. Waternish is N. Vatnsness, ‘Water-ness’; the first part in Snīzort is obscure, one expects a Norse personal name, Snī’s firth, as the Norse vowel ae of Snaesford = Snow-firth, which MacBain has suggested, never seems to yield Gadhelic ī long. Or is it another irregular treatment of vowel quantity? Perhaps ‘slice-firth,’ N. sníð ‘slice,’ also to ‘go zig-zag.’

 

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The Norse Influence on Celtic Scotland by Henderson George

Author:Henderson, George [Henderson, George] , Date: June 6, 2019

,Views: 21

Author:Henderson, George [Henderson, George]

Language: eng

Format: azw3

Publisher: AlbaCraft Publishing

Published: 2013-02-12T16:00:00+00:00
Connspunn na h-aoidhealachd

leòghann na rìoghalachd

in his poem on Sir James Macdonald of Sleat, as also bruidhinn, bridhinn, ‘speaking, talk,’ elsewhere: the change from rīgh to ruigh, raoigh, in the G. for ‘king’ is common. So in Ivist, Uivist, Ui’ist. The name Uist, says Munch, is simply the Norse īvist, habitation, etc. A transitional spelling is shown in Wyest of 1615. Even by dropping the N. initial ī the transition is easy to Gadhelic Ui’st. There is no pre-Celtic or non-Aryan inscrutableness in this word. Skye is named in Norse Skídh; the Dean of Lismore refers to the island as Clar Skeith, ‘the Board of Skith,’ showing that the Norse name of the island was remembered and translated by Clar: Norse Skidh has among other meanings that of ‘tablet.’ Both Adamnan’s form, Scia (circa 700 A.D.) and Tigernach’s form in his Annals for the year 688, which is Scith, agree with the modern pronunciation, which have ĭ short, as in Sgĭtheanach, ‘Skye-man.’ “The earliest charter and record forms of the name Skye are Skey (1292), Sky (1336), and Ski in the Manx Chronicle. Adamnan’s Scia shows no trace of th. The root is Celtic sky, ‘cut, slice,’ and the whole means the ‘indented isle.’ The root ski is still the basis of Gaelic sgīath and Norse skídh.”60 Although the name is pre-Norse, Skye abounds in Norse names. Ūig, N. vík, ‘bay’; Sleat, G. Sléit, from N. sléttr, ‘level’; Minginish, N. mikinn-nes, ‘great or main ness’; Trotternish, G. Trontarnis (n inserted to show the nasal of the present pronunciation), N. Þrondar-nes, ‘Thrond’s nes,’ Thrond being a frequent personal name in Icelandic: cf. Trondhjem, in Norway. Bràcadal, N. brekka-dalr, ‘brink or slope dale,’ the ā being sporadically lengthened in Gadhelic here, if we do not postulate some dialectal variance in the Norse of the Viking period, as E. brink, together with Danish and Swedish, preserve an older form than N. brekka. Waternish is N. Vatnsness, ‘Water-ness’; the first part in Snīzort is obscure, one expects a Norse personal name, Snī’s firth, as the Norse vowel ae of Snaesford = Snow-firth, which MacBain has suggested, never seems to yield Gadhelic ī long. Or is it another irregular treatment of vowel quantity? Perhaps ‘slice-firth,’ N. sníð ‘slice,’ also to ‘go zig-zag.’

Duirinish, N. Dŷr, ‘deer,’ hence Deer’s-ness, G. Diurinis; Armadale, N. arm + dalr, ‘bay-dale.’

Staffin, named from its basaltic rock, ‘the Staff,’ N. stafr, ‘pillar,’ with affixed article.

Kirkibost and Mugstad, ‘Kirk-ton’ and ‘Monks-stead’ respectively, derive from Norse. N. bost, ‘township, stead,’ further appears in Hūsabost, ‘House-stead’; Braebost, ‘Broad-stead’; Carbost, ‘Kari’s stead or town’; Cealabost (= Colbost of the map), ‘Keeltown’; Orrbost, ‘Orri’s-town.’

Words compounded with animal and bird- and fish-names are not uncommon here: N. hestr, ‘horse,’ gives Eilean Heast, G. an d-Eisde, where there is a rock called an t-Aigeach, ‘the stallion,’ in Eist at Duirinish: further, in Eisdeal, the island Easdale (where we have to do with either N. völlr, ‘field,’ or fjall, ‘hill,’ in the ending), ‘horse-field or horse-fell,’ with the name extended to

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