Buku The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon
Rp149,000.00 Tambah ke keranjang

Buku The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon

Rp149,000.00

Free worldwide shipping on all orders over $50

  • 30 days easy returns
  • Order yours before 2.30pm for same day dispatch
Guaranteed Safe Checkout

Deskripsi

Jual Buku
The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon

Author:Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon

Language: eng

Format: epub

Tags: Business & Economics, Economic Development, Financial Risk Management, Strategic Planning

Publisher: HarperCollins

Published: 2019-01-15T03:00:00+00:00

WE ONLY SELL HIGH QUALITY REPRINTED BOOKS, at AFFORDABLE PRICE

Ingin dalam bentuk ebook? Order disini>>

Kwalitas Reprint Book Bukan Buku Original (Kwalitas hampir setara)

Diprint dengan mesin terbaik, Mengunakan Lem Panas Press laminasi sehingga cover lebih lengket
#Ukuran B5 (Standart Buku Original)
#Kertas Bookpaper/HVS Lebih baik untuk mata, tidak menyebabkan mata cepat lelah,
#Mengunakan Kwalitas kertas terbaik
#Kwalitas tinta tajam dan bagus (mirip Original)
#Cover dengan Softcover, jika anda membutuhkan hardcover silahkan request
#Packing sudah include Bubble Wrap dan EXTRA SAFETY untuk Hard Cover, 100% AMAN

Ingin Buku Original yang tersedia cek disini>> 

Melayani Juga
Jual Buku Import Original
Jual ebook Buku
The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon

NOTES

1.“Vicente Fox,” PBS interview Commanding Heights, interview conducted April 4, 2001, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/commandingheights/shared/minitext/int_vicentefox.html.

2.From the OECD website: “GDP per hour worked is a measure of labour productivity. It measures how efficiently labour input is combined with other factors of production and used in the production process. Labour input is defined as total hours worked of all persons engaged in production. Labour productivity only partially reflects the productivity of labour in terms of the personal capacities of workers or the intensity of their effort.”

 

##Sample Book

[ux_instagram_feed username=”#kotabook”]

Jual Buku
The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon

jual Buku
The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon murah, jual ebook murah, jual ebook import, jual buku import, jual buku Buku
The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon

 

Home

>

Business & Money

>

Processes & Infrastructure

>

Strategic Planning

The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon

Author:Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon , Date: July 2, 2019

,Views: 111

Author:Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon

Language: eng

Format: epub

Tags: Business & Economics, Economic Development, Financial Risk Management, Strategic Planning

Publisher: HarperCollins

Published: 2019-01-15T03:00:00+00:00
NOTES

1.“Vicente Fox,” PBS interview Commanding Heights, interview conducted April 4, 2001, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/commandingheights/shared/minitext/int_vicentefox.html.

2.From the OECD website: “GDP per hour worked is a measure of labour productivity. It measures how efficiently labour input is combined with other factors of production and used in the production process. Labour input is defined as total hours worked of all persons engaged in production. Labour productivity only partially reflects the productivity of labour in terms of the personal capacities of workers or the intensity of their effort.”

“GDP per hour worked: OECD Data,” OECD, accessed April 10, 2018, https://data.oecd.org/lprdty/gdp-per-hour-worked.htm.

3.David Johnson, “These Are the Most Productive Countries in the World,” Time, January 4, 2017, http://time.com/4621185/worker-productivity-countries/.

4.In 2015, according to the Observatory of Economic Complexity, Mexico’s five largest exports were cars, $31.4 billion; vehicle parts, $26.2 billion; delivery trucks, $23.4 billion; computers, $21.2 billion; and telephones, $15.7 billion. More than 80 percent of Mexico’s exports end up in the United States. See Mexico’s profile on the Atlas for Economic Complexity site here: https://atlas.media.mit.edu/en/profile/country/mex/.

5.Mexico has maintained an average inflation rate of 3.9 percent since 2006. Real interest rates in 2015 hovered around 0.9 percent; Iceland, the United States, and Switzerland had real interest rates of 1.6 percent, 2.2 percent, and 3.3 percent respectively.

6.FDI in Mexico in 1993 was approximately $4.3 billion; twenty years later, in 2013, it had increased more than eleven times, reaching approximately $47.5 billion. This increase in FDI is due in part to Mexico’s relatively stable macroeconomic environment.

7.The fact that Mexico doesn’t simply export toys and T-shirts is important. Research by Harvard University’s Ricardo Hausmann and MIT’s César A. Hidalgo has helped us understand that the complexity of a country’s economy (how sophisticated the products it makes are) is highly correlated with its development level. More capable countries that can produce more sophisticated products tend to be richer.

César A. Hidalgo and Ricardo Hausmann, “The building blocks of economic complexity,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, no. 26 (June 2009).

8.“Economy Rankings,” Doing Business, The World Bank, accessed April 2, 2018, http://www.doingbusiness.org/rankings.

9.For a more in-depth economic history of Mexico pre-1960, read Section 2 of “Catch-up Growth Followed by Stagnation: Mexico, 1950–2010,” written by Timothy J. Kehoe and Felipe Meza, https://www.minneapolis fed.org/research/wp/wp693.pdf.

10.From a business standpoint, even though Mexico has more than twice the population of Korea and enjoys the benefits we mentioned above, the country has just nine companies on a Forbes list of the one thousand biggest public companies, compared with South Korea’s thirty-one. Also, South Korea’s credit rating is currently AA2, the third highest, according to Moody’s Investors, and AA- according to Fitch. Mexico’s is A3 with a negative outlook according to Moody’s, and it is BBB+ according to Fitch. By most measures, South Korea is outperforming Mexico economically.

11.Anahi Rama and Anna Yukhananov, “Mexican government says poverty rate rose to 46.2 percent in 2014,” Reuters, July 23, 2015, http://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-poverty-idUSKCN0PX2B320150723.

12.Gordon Hanson, of the University of California in San Diego and the National Bureau of Economic Research, has written extensively about Mexico and the role of maquiladoras in their economy.

Loading…

Download

The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon.epub

Copyright Disclaimer:

This site does not store any files on its server. We only index and link
to content provided by other sites. Please contact the content providers
to delete copyright contents if any and email us, we’ll remove relevant
links or contents immediately.

Ulasan

Belum ada ulasan.

Jadilah yang pertama memberikan ulasan “Buku The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty by Clayton M. Christensen & Efosa Ojomo & Karen Dillon”

Alamat email Anda tidak akan dipublikasikan. Ruas yang wajib ditandai *